What’s my relationship to change?

Posted
06/09/2016

Whilst it is true that change is a constant, how often do we give attention to what capacity we have available, or our ability or capability to deal with the consequences of change? What's our relationship to change? What levels of skill might be required for us to navigate the consequences of meeting the demands of that change?

For organisations going through transition, the ability of staff to bring effective responses to change is critical. Individual resilience and self-management means that individuals can appreciate the wider context, become more responsible for their own approach to change (ownership of change rather than ‘being done to’), and develop the skills of contributing and influence rather than resistance or denial.

You might want to consider some of these questions to gain further insight into your relationship with change:

What personal beliefs and values sustain you through a tough time? Does a huge change shake your faith in yourself or make it stronger? Do you review your priorities and current values? Can you let go of what no longer serves you? Can you allow temporary changes in preferred ways of being in order to work more creatively with the change?

What is your usual emotional reaction to big change in your life? Does it overwhelm you; do you tend to withdraw from others or make contact with lots of folk? Does your quality of sleep get interrupted by sleeping too much or not enough? Do you manage to continue with your daily routine or are you so overwhelmed you cannot think straight?

What coping strategies do you have to help you manage unexpected life changes? Do you fall back into an old pattern or do you try new coping methods? Are you able to review a situation, recognizing what works and what gets in the way? What outside help is available: talking to friends and family, reading books, researching on the internet, seeking professional help?

What new skills might be helpful? What would help build on the existing skills you have but may have forgotten? How willing are you to reflect and learn from your own past experiences? What can you take from learning from others – new ways to act and ways not to act?

When we watch others successfully cope with a problem, we have the opportunity to copy their behaviour. Over time we can adapt their model to our unique needs and style.

It is possible to develop coping strategies and skills, along with awareness of our own behaviour, to reset our relationship with change.

Read Benita’s other blog on this subject: Surviving and thriving through change.

Benita Treanor

Associate

Leadership consultant, facilitator, coach and supervisor, she offers a ‘whole hearted’ approach to connecting people to their passion, values and purpose

Benita Treanor